The Don't Say the Pledge Boycott

How the Pledge uses religion to divide.

“Under God” compromises the patriotic message of the Pledge


“Under God” wasn’t part of the original Pledge of Allegiance. Those two words were added to the Pledge in 1954, when the country was in the grip of McCarthyism and communist witch-hunt hysteria.


Before 1954, the Pledge affirmed that we were “one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” Indivisible means we can rise above our differences, religious or otherwise. Liberty means the right to act and speak freely no matter what one’s faith or philosophy may be. And Justice, of course, means equal rights for all, regardless of whether or not we believe in a deity.  The Knights of Columbus – a Catholic men’s group – led the lobbying effort to add “under God.”  Now the Pledge is twisted, with divisive religious language that implies true patriots must be believers.


With “under God” added, the Pledge is not a statement of patriotism. Instead, extremist preachers and politicians point to the language to validate their view that those who don’t believe in God don’t belong.








Religious or not, don’t say this altered Pledge


Until the Pledge is restored to its inclusive version, we can take it upon ourselves to refuse to participate in what’s become a discriminatory exercise. (Note: A Supreme Court case – West Virginia vs. Barnette –gives public school students the absolute right to sit out the Pledge, for any reason. Public schools might not tell you about this right, but if anyone questions you about sitting out the Pledge, contact the AHA’s Legal Center.)


Whether you are religious or not, you can make a statement for true inclusiveness. Support liberty and justice for all, and support indivisibility. Stand up for America by sitting down during the Pledge of Allegiance boycott until the inclusive version is restored.

Some states, such as Florida and Texas, require public school students to get parental permission to opt out of the Pledge. If you have questions about your state, contact us at the AHA.


Are you taking a stand by sitting down? Tell us your experience of sitting out the Pledge of Allegiance.

Have you been disciplined by a public school teacher or school administrator for exercising your right to sit during the Pledge of Allegiance? Contact our legal team.